Blog

Alliterative business names

Using alliteration is a great way to make company names more memorable.

One of the main criteria that branding experts mention in relation to good business names is memorability. Think of it yourself: what’s the use of developing a great product if your customers cannot remember how it is called?!

Company names that include alliteration are very often more memorable than those that do not. In essence, the term “alliteration” refers to the repetition of certain consonant sounds in the first syllables of consecutive words or phrases. Numerous tongue twisters make use of alliteration; for example, try saying the famous phrases like “Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers” or “She sells sea-shells on the sea-shore”. Such sentences are without a doubt much easier to remember than those that have no alliteration; on the other hand, overusing the language device may result in articulatory complexity, which is a feature we do not need in our company name.

Examples of alliterative names

Since most businesses prefer short names, complex articulation isn’t something that we need to worry about too much. Moreover, a lot of businesses have benefited from alliteration for years now. Think of well-known brands such as Coca-Cola, Dunkin’ Donuts, Bed Bath & Beyond, Johnson & Johnson or PayPal. Even in the famous Harry Potter series a decent number of characters have alliterative names (Moaning Myrtle, Luna Lovegood, Salazar Slytherin. Helga Hufflepuff, Godric Gryffindor, Dudley Dursley, Peter Pettigrew).

Alliteration in NameStation

Inspired by the demand for such names, NameStation has developed a feature that enables you to create names with alliterative characteristics. For that you need to pick a term that you want to be present in the name and the system automatically appends or prepends words or letter combinations with similar beginnings. NameStation also allows you to match word ends .

For example, typing the word hair in the search box results in entries such as HairHaze, HairHail, HairHand, HairHay and many more. With summer the system offers SummonSummer, SummerSuit, SundaeSummer or SummerSundae, etc.

If it happens that some names are in the right direction but not quite what you are looking for, try clicking “More like this” behind the names you like better. This function offers you a  list of  similar entries that are just slightly different from the original name.

This entry was posted in Domain Search, Linguistics and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response

  1. I know this web page presents quality depending content and other material, is there any other site which gives these kinds of information in quality?

Comments are closed.